Stadiums USA - America's Home For Stadium Information
  • Member Login

  • register

A’s owners urged to swing for new stadium

Posted November 17, 2014

Ron Leuty - San Francisco Business Times - 

 

A group of Oakland business leaders broke off pursuit of Howard Terminal as a new home for the Oakland Athletics and urged A's owners to commit to the city or sell the team.

In an opinion piece Saturday in the Oakland Tribune, Safeway Inc. ChairmanT. Gary Rogers and Don Knauss, chairman and outgoing CEO of Clorox Corp. board, said if A's owners "don't believe in Oakland then we urge them to sell the team, so that they won't spend the next 10 years as they've spent the last eight — doing nothing to get a new ballpark in Oakland."

Rogers and Knauss — along with developers Michael Ghielmetti and Seth Hamalian, Ezra Roizen of investment bank Ackrell Capital and Douglas Boxer — are part of Oakland Waterfront Ballpark LLC.That group formed late last year, arranged an exclusive negotiating agreement with the Port of Oakland, which controls the Howard Terminal property, and studied a plan for a $500 million, privately funded, 38,000-seat baseball stadium to woo the A's away from plans to move to San Jose.

A group of Oakland business leaders broke off pursuit of Howard Terminal as a new home for the Oakland Athletics and urged A's owners to commit to the city or sell the team.

In an opinion piece Saturday in the Oakland Tribune, Safeway Inc. ChairmanT. Gary Rogers and Don Knauss, chairman and outgoing CEO of Clorox Corp. board, said if A's owners "don't believe in Oakland then we urge them to sell the team, so that they won't spend the next 10 years as they've spent the last eight — doing nothing to get a new ballpark in Oakland."

Rogers and Knauss — along with developers Michael Ghielmetti and Seth Hamalian, Ezra Roizen of investment bank Ackrell Capital and Douglas Boxer — are part of Oakland Waterfront Ballpark LLC.That group formed late last year, arranged an exclusive negotiating agreement with the Port of Oakland, which controls the Howard Terminal property, and studied a plan for a $500 million, privately funded, 38,000-seat baseball stadium to woo the A's away from plans to move to San Jose.

A's owners' view of the Bay Area economy as they seek a move to San Jose "is 15 years out of date," Rogers and Knauss wrote, referencing an economic shift from the South Bay to San Francisco and Oakland.

"It is our firm opinion, as well as that of a great many technical experts, that Howard Terminal is not only a viable site but is the ideal site for the long-term benefit of both the city of Oakland and the Oakland A's franchise," Rogers and Knauss wrote.